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Recent enquiries

inkstand

Some recent examples of requests for help from members of the public.

20 inch Seder Plate

Enquiry

 

Good Afternoon, This platter can be traced back to my great grandparents. The background, as told to me, is that our family escaped from France to Germany, to escape persecution against our Jewish Religion. Before my Great Grandparents immigrated from Germany to the States, this platter was dug up, out of the ground, and completed the journey, with them. It was held onto, even when they lost their wealth, during the Great Depression. The platter is still within our family and my cousin is in possession, of this incredible piece, of our history. We have been told very little of our background, only the basics. We are very curious of the age and perhaps value?. This platter has been translated for us by a Rabbi at an university, versed in the old Hebrew. Just curious and hoping to piece a little more of our secretive heritage, together. Thank You

Seder Touch Marks

Answer from the enquiry team

This appears to be a ‘seder’ or Passover charger made of cast pewter with a single rim decorated overall in bowl and rim with fine engraving and Jewish inscriptions. The central rectangular motif possibly depicts the exodus from Egypt. 

There are two pewterers touch marks struck on the reverse, a crown rose quality touch with possibly the word “Harper” or similar in the top rim but too distressed to be certain. The right hand oval touch is of an angel in the style of similar ones used in the Flemish town of Turnhout, apparently lacking the more usual sword and scales of Justice.   There is a further distressed pewterers name “ Johan   ? ”  in the left hand rim.    This has not been possible to identify but there was a Iudo van Gasten, a pewterer ( also variously  k/as Judocus or Judeaus) , one of a family of pewterers active in that town c. 1761-1821.    It was sometimes found that two pewterers, possibly working together, would both strike their touches on an item.   

Jews were prohibited from membership of the Continental Pewterers Guilds but many were employed by them..  Seder dishes were often engraved by Jewish folk artistes and this is possibly just such a fine example.

The assessment below is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

Teapot

ENQUIRY

 

Hi! The story of this pewter pot is that it was passed down from eldest daughter to eldest daughter (though that was not always the case), coming over to Massachusetts on the Mayflower with Richard Warren. I would love to have some sense of the date of this pot to see if there is any accuracy to this story. I currently live in Medford, OR, but my grandmother received this from her father (his mother died in childbirth) in French Lick, IN. Her father was John Southern Taylor, his mother Mary Clementine Southern, her mother Mary Clorinda Pierce, her father George Ricks Pierce, his mother Mary Spooner, her father Benjamin S Spooner, his father Benjamin Spooner, his mother Sarah Warren, her father Nathaniel Warren, back to his father Richard Warren, who was written to have been born around 1579 in London, England. The pot is about 6 in. tall and about 7.5 in. from handle edge to spout. I don’t see any markings on it. Thank you for any help you can give me in estimating age and location of origin.

Teapot Lid

Answer from the enquiry team

This is, indeed, an early Britannia Metal teapot made by an unknown pewterer. Britannia Metal is pewter by definition but contains no lead in the alloy and first evolved in the latter part of the eighteenth century. B.M. can be formed into much sheets thinner than cast pewter as the lid of this pot demonstrates around the hinge etc.,  The first pewter teapot was made in the USA by a pewterer called Richardson after 1818 and this is very much in the same shape indeed and might be one of his. The style of the handle is very similar.  But sadly not made before the Pilgrim Fathers !

 

The assessment below is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

Coffee Pot

Enquiry

Can you give me any information on this item?  I had my husband take it to work today to identify that is is Pewter, but have no idea what the markings mean.  It is also signed on the bottom with a couple of initials and I can send that too if you want.  I just don’t know how any pictures I can send at once.

Coffee pot marks

Answer from the enquiry team

This is a very sturdy cast pewter ( undoubtedly from the fine analysis enclosed with your query )  coffee pot with a wooden handle and acorn knop. Made in the early twentieth century the touch marks are probably too late for our records and the pewterer not identified but the style of the left hand angel of justice is very typical of those struck in Hamburg, Germany earlier. The other initials not seen are possibly ownership ones of a previous owner. 

 

 

The assessment above/below is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

 Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

Pair of Plates

ENQUIRY

 

 

Hello,  I purchased these two pewter plates at a flea market  in Georgia, USA. They are 9 3/4 inches. On the back of each plate is a mark which looks like a rose or some sort of flower with a crown over it. Over the top of the crown is engraved “Made”. Around the bottom of the flower it is engraved “In London”. Over the top of the crown is an “X”. The white label on the top of the plates says “Set of ten pewter George 3rd plates, 9 3/4” Made in England, c. 1780-1800”. The label is from a department store in Atlanta, Georgia, and it looks to be 1940’s or 1950’s. 

Any help you can give in identifying the marks will be appreciated. 

Thank you,

Harton London Label

Answer from the enquiry team

 

These are a pair of cast pewter plain rimmed plates which bear the rose and crown ‘ London’ label of two associated pewterers, namely Watts & Harton who were active in Aldgate, London 1836-1862 and Harton & Son active 1863-90 who were in Shoe Lane, London.    A third, described as a  ‘furnishing ironmonger’ is listed as using this mark 1817-1864 but he was probably not making pewter but selling the wares of associates. 

The assessment below is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

15 inch Dish

ENQUIRY

 

Hello, I’d be interested if you could tell me anything about my pewter platter. Photos attached. It’s 15” 38cm diameter.

Thank you

Regards

Dish Hallmarks

Answer from the enquiry team

 

Thanks for your enquiry 29 February.

This is an English plain rimmed pewter charger made by T & W Willshire who were working in Bristol 1793-1809. It carries the hallmarks(unusually 5 of them) of Thomas Willshire; fleu de lys; deer; crown; lion; initials TW as well as the touch marks for the later partnership.

I hope you enjoy your find,

 

We are pleased to have received your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you think in the future that you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website:

The assessment below is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

Miniature Plate

ENQUIRY

I have recently purchased this miniature pewter plate advertised as being 18th century. I'm new to antique collecting and probably very gullible so I wanted a second opinion on the age and origin. It is unmarked and plain so its difficult to find any information online. I am located in the US and I bought it on Ebay in an auction for $22. It is 8.2cm/3.25inch in diameter, and it weighs 59 grams. Thanks for any insight you can provide. 

Miniature Plate Rear

Answer from the enquiry team

Such saucer sized single rimmed cast pewter dishes were usually made around the turn of the twentieth century and sold when the interest in old pewter wares first started to be popular to fulfil a need. This, however, appears to have accumulated signs of genuine wear from the knife marks on the working surface and the back and possibly made earlier in the eighteenth or nineteenth century by an unknown pewterer.

The assessment below is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

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Answer from the enquiry team

 

 

The assessment below is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.