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Recent enquiries

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Some recent examples of requests for help from members of the public.

20 inch Seder Plate

Enquiry

 

Good Afternoon, This platter can be traced back to my great grandparents. The background, as told to me, is that our family escaped from France to Germany, to escape persecution against our Jewish Religion. Before my Great Grandparents immigrated from Germany to the States, this platter was dug up, out of the ground, and completed the journey, with them. It was held onto, even when they lost their wealth, during the Great Depression. The platter is still within our family and my cousin is in possession, of this incredible piece, of our history. We have been told very little of our background, only the basics. We are very curious of the age and perhaps value?. This platter has been translated for us by a Rabbi at an university, versed in the old Hebrew. Just curious and hoping to piece a little more of our secretive heritage, together. Thank You

Seder Touch Marks

Answer from the enquiry team

This appears to be a ‘seder’ or Passover charger made of cast pewter with a single rim decorated overall in bowl and rim with fine engraving and Jewish inscriptions. The central rectangular motif possibly depicts the exodus from Egypt. 

There are two pewterers touch marks struck on the reverse, a crown rose quality touch with possibly the word “Harper” or similar in the top rim but too distressed to be certain. The right hand oval touch is of an angel in the style of similar ones used in the Flemish town of Turnhout, apparently lacking the more usual sword and scales of Justice.   There is a further distressed pewterers name “ Johan   ? ”  in the left hand rim.    This has not been possible to identify but there was a Iudo van Gasten, a pewterer ( also variously  k/as Judocus or Judeaus) , one of a family of pewterers active in that town c. 1761-1821.    It was sometimes found that two pewterers, possibly working together, would both strike their touches on an item.   

Jews were prohibited from membership of the Continental Pewterers Guilds but many were employed by them..  Seder dishes were often engraved by Jewish folk artistes and this is possibly just such a fine example.

The assessment below is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

Thistle Container

ENQUIRY

 

I have been asked by an elderly gentleman, ex Kenyan of English descent, to help identify a piece of  unknown origin-photos attached.

He no longer remembers how it came into his possession.

I am certainly no expert or even an amateur pewter identifier –it may not even be pewter.

The piece is approx 4 inches long and has a makers/factory mark as can be seen in one of the attachments,

Any help would be appreciated

Thistle container mark

Answer from the enquiry team

Thanks for your enquiry about your stylish piece in the form of a thistle. It looks as though it is pewter or Britannia metal that has been electroplated with silver. It is reminiscent of a measure or stirrup cup dating from the 20th century. The maker is MD whose initials are around the fleu de lys mark and the pattern number is 5770. Sadly, I have been unable to identify the maker so cannot give you any more information. He is a little too late for our databases on antique pewter. Good luck with your research.

 

The assessment above is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

J Child inscription on pint mug

Enquiry

Good Morning

I am contacting you in the hope that you can assist us in providing more detailed information on a pewter mug.

The mug has been in the possession of a local collector for a number of years.  I attach a number of photographs.  The mug stands 11cm high and has a capacity of one pint.

 It is inscribed J Child.  We suspect that this refers to James Child, who was landlord of the Bulls Head in Ewhurst, Surrey in 1825.  His initials are repeated on the handle.

 There are three marks on the mug, which we hope you can help with.  There are no marks on the underside.

 

I look forward to hearing from you.

Truncated pint mug with verification marks

Answer from the enquiry team

The item is a truncated cone pint with “J Child Bulls Head Ewhurst” inscribed on the front in the usual script.  Touch of “Smith” on the base which could possibly be Charles Smith, 2, Market St. London 1867-1876.  It also has a Middlesex (three daggers) Excise Mark c. 1878 and an earlier Dorking Surrey (pre 1878) one.  A further faint mark  of a crown over W.R.  and some scratches unidentified. 

The assessment above is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

 Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

Pair of Plates

ENQUIRY

 

 

Hello,  I purchased these two pewter plates at a flea market  in Georgia, USA. They are 9 3/4 inches. On the back of each plate is a mark which looks like a rose or some sort of flower with a crown over it. Over the top of the crown is engraved “Made”. Around the bottom of the flower it is engraved “In London”. Over the top of the crown is an “X”. The white label on the top of the plates says “Set of ten pewter George 3rd plates, 9 3/4” Made in England, c. 1780-1800”. The label is from a department store in Atlanta, Georgia, and it looks to be 1940’s or 1950’s. 

Any help you can give in identifying the marks will be appreciated. 

Thank you,

Harton London Label

Answer from the enquiry team

 

These are a pair of cast pewter plain rimmed plates which bear the rose and crown ‘ London’ label of two associated pewterers, namely Watts & Harton who were active in Aldgate, London 1836-1862 and Harton & Son active 1863-90 who were in Shoe Lane, London.    A third, described as a  ‘furnishing ironmonger’ is listed as using this mark 1817-1864 but he was probably not making pewter but selling the wares of associates. 

The assessment above is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

Mug with verification marks

ENQUIRY

 

Dear Sir or Madam

 I am contacting you in regard to a piece of pewter that I have and would like help identifying the marks. 

 I believe it to be a rummer and all I know is that my grandfather purchased it many years ago in Brighton. It is 90mms high and about 65mms diameter.

 I do hope that you are able to help.

 Many thanks

 

 

Mug base mark

Answer from the enquiry team

This is a fine old cast pewter footed ‘tulip’ shaped pub half pint which has travelled considerably, mainly around Norfolk, possibly with the same publican over many years evidenced by the rich ‘harvest’ of Excise Marks struck around its mid-rift.    It has a decorative  fillet around that mid-rift and a double scroll or ‘broken’ handle.

 

The ‘portcullis’ however was struck by the authorities in the County of London before 1878 when confirming that it was not giving short measure at all.    The “crown VR over 550”  was struck in the County of Norfolk after 1878. But the most interesting is the one unusually struck under the base which may be clearer to you but looks like either “Crown over W4W” or “WWW” ( approx.) for which the most likely interpretation is Watchet Boro. & Williton Manor or even possibly Westmorland County  -   before 1878.      

 If you look in the inside of the base you may find the makers mark (k/as a touch mark) amid all the oxide and crud which accumulates there over time. This could possibly help dating the mug more accurately.   Gently probing with a soft piece of wood such as a lolly stick so as not to damage any writing that may be there may help and if this is successful do not hesitate to come back for further information. Otherwise there may be just a “Crown X” quality mark.

The assessment above is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

Excavated spoon fragment

ENQUIRY

Hello Pewter Society

Hoping you can identify this maker.

This piece was dug in Brandon

Excavated spoon mark

Answer from the enquiry team

Thanks for your enquiry about your excavated spoon handle.

I think this was made by George Grenfell working 1757-1784 at addresses in London(Gracechurch Street) and Exeter.

The assessment above is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.

French Urn

ENQUIRY

 

To whom it may concern:

This was from my parent’s home. We’re wondering if you can tell us what the markings mean? My mother’s father was an antique dealer in France, so not sure if it is from there. Thank you for any information you can give us!

 

Urn touch marks

Answer from the enquiry team

Your instincts were quite right it is from Besancon in France and made by the pewterer Claude-Antoine Gonelle who became a master in 1785.

I have found a reference to this particular footed ovoid form which seems peculiar to Besancon. The illustration is by another Besancon pewterer Madeleine Jouffroy (from 1696) but it carries the same commune mark as yours. They had lids, some surmounted with a dolphin knop, and were used in the kitchen for the storage of butter and flour. They were also thought to have been used for storage in apothecaries.

I hope you enjoy owning this part of your family’s history.

 

The assessment above is based on the best information available to us at present, but we cannot guarantee its accuracy as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly expanding.  It is for your personal information only and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited.

Whilst our service is free, the database we use to answer your query costs us a considerable amount of money a year to run.  If you would like to make a small donation towards this cost (preferably in pounds sterling), you can do so via PayPal to treasurer@pewtersociety.org and we'll be very grateful!

We were pleased to receive your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website: www.pewtersociety.org .  We post some enquiries anonymously in the "recent enquires" section of our website, and we hope you won't mind if we select yours for this.